UK: 10-Year Limit on Storing Frozen Eggs Breaches Old Women’s Human Rights Because They Need More Slut Time, Experts Warn

Pomidor Quixote
Daily Stormer
October 28, 2019

10 years of empowerment isn’t nearly enough.

Women need at least 3 decades of uninterrupted drunk parties, random sexual encounters and Excel sheet busywork.

That’s what life is all about.

Daily Mail:

The Government’s 10-year limit on storing frozen eggs is a ‘very clear breach of human rights’, fertility experts have warned.

Women’s eggs can be frozen for a long time with the latest technology – but current laws say they should be destroyed after a decade.

But the Progress Educational Trust says the ‘outdated’ legislation ‘harms women’s chances of becoming biological mothers’.

The charity fears women are having their eggs destroyed before they are even ready to start a family, or are rush to find a sperm donor.

So many PowerPoint presentations to do, so little time.

If only women could have their first baby at 65, the world would be a much more feminist place.

Sarah Norcross, director of PET, told the BBC that the current limit was ‘a very clear breach of human rights‘.

‘It curtails women’s reproductive choices, harms women’s chances of becoming biological mothers [and] does not have any scientific basis.’

She also added that it is ‘outdated’, ‘arbitrary’ and ‘discriminatory’ against women because of the decline in female fertility with age.

The limits were originally introduced because the risks of long-term storage were unknown at that point.

It is also plain misogynistic. I can’t believe that we’re this deep into current year and 80-year-old women are still not allowed to become first-time mothers.

How are we going to have female CEOs if women are forced to cut their awesome careers short because of their fleeting fertility?

PET says women deciding if they should freeze their eggs, which costs around £5,000 in the UK, must weigh up a complex set of odds.

The success rate for conceiving is higher the younger you are when you freeze eggs, and so experts recommend doing so before the age of 35.

However, women who freeze their eggs in their 20s are more likely to conceive naturally, making it a waste of money.

Younger eggs are healthier though, so it’s not really a waste of money.

For example, if a woman was to freeze her eggs at 25, the eggs would be destroyed at the age of 35, before she has possibly considered having a family.

She may also find out she is infertile at the age of 37, and at this point be advised to use donor eggs at another cost.

But if a woman was to wait and freeze her eggs at the age of 35, her fertility would already be in decline, making the process possibly less successful.

Sharon Jones, who decided to freeze her eggs more than a year ago, said there is ‘really no need’ for the 10-year limit.

She told the BBC: ‘The longer you wait, the longer you give yourself to meet someone. But the earlier you do it, the more likely the eggs are to be viable.’

The 35-year-old HR manager said she was left with a ‘real conundrum’ when making the decision to freeze her eggs, which has cost her £5,000.

She has her priorities right. Some things are more important than starting a family when you have the energy and good health to take care of your offspring.

All of the office work she’s done in her career will remember her as the great HR manager that she proved herself to be in life.

Lots of little PowerPoint and Excel documents will run around her garden, playing and laughing, at each and every one of her birthday parties.

On her deathbed, she’ll look at the little USB flash drive keeping all of her files with pride, knowing deep within her heart that she fulfilled her purpose.

With her last breath and a tear of joy running down one of her cheeks, she’ll wave goodbye to her legacy.

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